Tip of the month
Tip of the month - Depression may follow a diagnosis of chronic glaucoma, but depressive symptoms are less likely to be present one year later
Depression may follow a diagnosis of chronic glaucoma, but depressive symptoms are less likely to be present one year later

Publishing date: February 2019

Tip Editor: John Salmon
Tip reviewer: Roger Hitchings

The Science behind the Tip

It is common for a newly-diagnosed patient with glaucoma to experience symptoms of depression (1,2). Patients who are young, female, less well-educated and who have poor vision are more likely to become depressed (2).

Continued depression has been linked to reduced adherence to medication and fast visual field progression (3). However, symptoms of this nature are less likely to be present one year later, once the IOP has been reduced and the visual fields stabilised (2). This is closely related to a reduction in the fear of blindness (4). Ophthalmologists should monitor symptoms, provide reassurance and refer to an appropriate specialist if depression persists.

Contributor: John F Salmon MD - Oxford Eye Hospital - UK



References

1. Manuchi F, Yoshimura K , Kashiwagi K et al. High prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma. J Glaucoma 2008; 17: 552-557.

2. Musch Dc, Niziol LM, Jane NK et al. Trends in and predictors of depression among participants in the Collaborative Initial Glaucoma Treatment Study (CIGTS). Am J Ophthalmol 2019; 197:128-135.

3. Dinis-Filho A, Abe RY, Cho HY et al. Fast visual field progression is associated with depressive symptoms in patients with glaucoma. Ophthalmology 2016; 123:754-759.

4. Janz NK, Wren PA, Guire KE et al. Fear of blindness in the Collaborative Initial Glaucoma Treatment Study: patterns and correlates over time. Ophthalmology 2007;2213-2220.



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