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Journal Club
Clinical Paper of the Month - Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure in Glaucoma A Prospective Study.
Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure in Glaucoma A Prospective Study.

Publishing date: February 2010

Author(s): Ren R, Jonas JB, Tian G, Zhen Y, Ma K, Li S, Wang H, Li B, Zhang X, Wang N

Beijing Institute of Ophthalmology, Beijing Tongren Eye Center, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China; Beijing Tongren Eye Center, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University Beijing, China.

PURPOSE: To assess whether a low cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSF-P) is associated with open-angle glaucoma in eyes with normal intraocular pressure (IOP).

DESIGN: Prospective, interventional study.

PARTICIPANTS: The study included 43 patients with open-angle glaucoma (14 with a normal IOP, and 29 with an elevated IOP) and 71 subjects without glaucoma.

INTERVENTIONS: All patients underwent standardized ophthalmologic and neurologic examinations and measurement of lumbar CSF-P.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cerebrospinal fluid pressure and IOP.

RESULTS: Lumbar CSF-P was significantly (P<0.001) lower in the normal IOP glaucoma group (9.5+/-2.2 mmHg) than in the high IOP glaucoma group (11.7+/-2.7 mmHg) or the control group (12.9+/-1.9 mmHg). The trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference (IOP minus CSF-P) was significantly (P<0.001) higher in the normal IOP glaucoma group (6.6+/-3.6 mmHg) and the high-IOP glaucoma group (12.5+/-4.1 mmHg) than in the control group (1.4+/-1.7 mmHg). The extent of glaucomatous visual field loss was negatively correlated with the height of the CSF-P and positively correlated with the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference. In the control group, CSF-P was significantly correlated with both systolic blood pressure (P = 0.04) and IOP (P<0.001). The trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference was not significantly associated with blood pressure (P = 0.97). CONCLUSIONS: In open-angle glaucoma with normal IOP, CSF-P is abnormally low, leading to an abnormally high trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference. Pathogenetically, a low CSF-P in normal-IOP glaucoma may be similar to a high IOP in high-IOP glaucoma. Consequently, the glaucomatous visual field defect is positively correlated with the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference and inversely correlated with the CSF-P. In nonglaucomatous subjects, CSF-P, blood pressure, and IOP are significantly associated with each other.

FINANCIAL DISCLOSURES: The authors have no proprietary or commercial interest in any of the materials discussed in this article.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19969367



Clinical Paper of the Month manager: Andreas Boehm




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